Jan 172017
 
Gene Cernan On The Moon

Gene Cernan On The Moon. Photo Courtesy of Egger1.com

“During 20 years as a Naval Aviator, including 13 years with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Captain Eugene A. Cernan left his mark on history with three historic missions in space as the Pilot of Gemini IX, the Lunar Module Pilot of Apollo X, and the Commander of Apollo XVII. After flying to the moon not once, but twice, he also holds the distinction of being the second American to walk in space and the last man to have left his footprints on the lunar surface.

Captain Cernan received a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University in 1956 and a Master of Science degree in Aeronautical Engineering from the United States Naval Post Graduate School in 1963. Among his numerous honors, the most significant are the Navy Distinguished Flying Cross, the Distinguished Service Medal with Star, the NASA Distinguished Service Medal, the FAI International Gold Medal for Space, induction into the U.S. Space Hall of Fame, enshrinement into the National Aviation Hall of Fame, Naval Aviation’s Hall of Honor and the International Aerospace Hall of Fame. Captain Cernan was awarded NASA’s first Ambassador of Exploration Award, the Federal Aviation Administration’s prestigious Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award, and the 2007 Lindbergh Spirit Award presented only every five years. In December, 2007, The National Aeronautic Association presented Captain Cernan with one of the most prestigious aviation trophies in the world, the Wright Brothers Memorial Trophy, in Washington, DC. Last April, Captain Cernan was honored by receiving the 2008 Rotary National Award for Space Achievement, and he recently received the Federation Aeronautique Internationale (FAI) Gold Air Medal, one of the most important international awards, in the Fall of 2008.”
(Excerpt from http://egger1.com)

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said in a statement after Cernan’s death:
“Truly, America has lost a patriot and pioneer who helped shape our country’s bold ambitions to do things that humankind had never before achieved.”

In honor of Gene Cernan’s passing L.A. Mayor, Eric Garcetti said:
“Today, we lost one of America’s greatest astronauts, Gene Cernan, the last man to set foot on the moon and one of only three people to travel to the moon twice. Gene inspired a generation of budding scientists to turn their eyes to the sky in awe and dedicate their lives to space exploration. In the wake of his passing, I’m reminded of Gene’s own words, and the message he worked to instill in our nation’s young people: ‘I walked on the moon. What can’t you do?”

Captain Eugene A. Cernan died at 82 following a fulfilled (and amazing!) life. He was the commander of the final Apollo (Apollo 17) lunar landing mission (during which he took his historic walk on the Moon) in 1972. We didn’t make any progress in traveling to – or exploring – the Moon since… (in 45 years!)

“Too many years have passed for me to still be the last man to have left his footprints on the Moon. I believe with all my heart that somewhere out there is a young boy or girl with indomitable will and courage who will lift that dubious distinction from my shoulders and take us back where we belong. Let us give that dream a chance.”
Captain Eugene A. Cernan

 

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Dec 092016
 
John Glenn During the Mercury-Atlas 6 Spaceflight

John Glenn During the Mercury-Atlas 6 Spaceflight. On Feb. 20, 1962, John H. Glenn, Jr., became the first American to orbit Earth. Image credit: NASA

John Glenn, the first American to orbit the Earth in 1962 (one year after the Russian astronaut Yuri Gagarin, the first human being to travel into space) has died.

This is an excerpt from the NASA Website:

“Glenn, who served four terms as a U.S. senator from Ohio, was one of NASA’s original seven Mercury astronauts. His flight on Friendship 7 on Feb. 20, 1962, showed the world that America was a serious contender in the space race with the Soviet Union. It also made Glenn an instant hero.

His mission of almost nine days on the space shuttle orbiter Discovery, launched Oct. 29, 1998, when he was 77, made him the oldest human to venture into space. On Discovery he participated in a series of tests on the aging process. The aging population was one focus of his work as a U.S. senator.

Glenn was described as “humble, funny, and generous” by Trevor Brown, dean of the John Glenn School of Public Affairs at Ohio State University, in a statement joined by the Glenn family. “Even after leaving public life, he loved to meet with citizens, school children in particular. He thrilled to music and had a weakness for chocolate.”

John Glenn was highly respected, well-liked and had an extra-ordinarily fulfilled life.

He was a veteran of the WW2 and the Korean War. Well-educated and committed to learning, Glenn went from the Navy to NASA. He made history as an aviator and astronaut. After retiring from NASA, Glenn entered the political arena in Ohio were he’s been very popular. (He has won FOUR consecutive terms.) As US Senator, John Glenn was a champion of environmental protection, fought to prevent the spread of weapons of mass destruction and called for a cleanup of nuclear waste.

John Glenn, an American Hero passed away. His legacy will have a place in history books.

Anything L.A. Magazine’s Editor, Eve Elrich

 

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Jun 222012
 

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and NASA will explore cutting-edge film techniques and virtual voyages using animation on Tuesday, July 10, at 7:30 p.m. at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills. Hosted by five-time Oscar®-nominated producer Frank Marshall, “Capturing the Final Frontier” will feature film clips and conversations with such filmmakers as Oscar-winning visual effects supervisor Scott Farrar and leading NASA animators and scientists (see complete list on www.oscars.org).

The Academy and NASA Venture to the Final Frontier

The Academy and NASA Venture to the Final Frontier

Presented by the Academy’s Science and Technology Council, the event will take a journey through the space program’s breakthroughs in animation with NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Eric De Jong, who began his career creating Voyager animations. The evening features a look at Mars rover Curiosity graphics in anticipation of its landing on the Red Planet in August 2012.NASA animators and image specialists regularly take these visual concepts a step further by joining forces with Hollywood filmmakers to create new wonders for the big screen. “Capturing the Final Frontier” will examine some of these collaborations, exploring the documentary films “Hubble 3D” (2010) and “Roving Mars” (2006) along with feature films “Mission to Mars” (2000) and the Oscar-nominated “Transformers: Dark of the Moon” (2011).

Tickets for “Capturing the Final Frontier” are $5 for the general public and $3 for Academy members and students with a valid ID, and may be purchased online at www.oscars.org, in person at the Academy box office, or by mail.

The Samuel Goldwyn Theater is located at 8949 Wilshire Boulevard in Beverly Hills. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Ticketed seating is unreserved. For more information, call (310) 247-3600 or visit www.oscars.org.