Aug 052016
 

SpecialFreeAdmissionDaysInLosAngeles

Schindler House | Photo courtesy of Michael Locke, Flickr

Some of the most interesting places in L.A. have free admission days! Read through the list below; take notes and take in all the sights free of charge. Great experiences, great things to see, opportunities to bond with family and friends while discovering L.A. cultural treasures regardless of your budget!

  1. Autry National Center: The center’s galleries explore broad themes relating to the history and diverse cultures of the American West. Free admission on the second Tuesday of every month.
  2. Craft & Folk Art Museum (CAFAM): Exploring the leading edge of craft, art and design, CAFAM gives audience to diverse makers and artists whose work is often not represented in larger art institutions. CAFAM is a place to see art and make art – all under one roof. Free admission every Sunday.
  3. USC Pacific Asia Museum: With more than 15,000 objects in their extensive collections, the Pacific Asia Museum in Pasadena span 5000 years of Asia’s and the Pacific Islands’ history and include paintings and drawings, ceramics, textiles and more. Free admission the second Sunday of every month.
  4. Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens: An oasis of art and culture on 207 acres, explore breathtaking themed gardens, a conservatory, four art galleries and a library showcasing collections of rare books. Free admission on the first Thursday of every month with advance tickets, which can be reserved online or by phone.
  5. Japanese American National Museum: This museum is internationally recognized for its commitment to exploring the meaning of America’s ethnic and cultural diversity by sharing the experience of Japanese Americans through exhibitions, public programs, an award-winning museum store, and resource center. Free admission every Thursday from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., and every third Thursday of the month.
  6. Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA): With more than 120,000 works in its permanent collection, LACMA is the premier visual art museum in the western United States. With the addition of the Broad Contemporary Art Museum (BCAM), LACMA became the first encyclopedic museum with a dedicated facility for contemporary art, which is uniquely appropriate to Los Angeles. Free admission on the second Tuesday of every month; Target sponsors free admission on select federal holidays; free admission for L.A. County residents after 3 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday.
  7. MAK Center for Art and Architecture at the Schindler House: One of L.A.’s most significant cultural venues, the MAK Center for Art and Architecture is located in the historic Schindler House and features rotating art exhibitions about cultural issues, experimentation and invention. Free admission on Fridays from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., as well as on International Museum Day (held annually in May) and Schindler’s birthday (September 10).
  8. Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA): Downtown’s premier art museum features one of the best permanent collections in the country, with works by artists such as Roy Lichtenstein, Mark Rothko and more. Free admission every Thursday from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
  9. The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA: With cutting-edge exhibitions, hands-on education programs and popular evening events, this is your source for inspiration and a must-see for contemporary art enthusiasts. Free admission every Thursday from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
  10. Museum of Latin American Art: With a focus on rotating exhibitions, the museum highlights significant contributions to the field of contemporary Latin American art. Meanwhile, its permanent collection anchors the museum with works by Wilfredo Lam and Alejandro Colunga, among others. Free admission every Sunday.
  11. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County: The museum, recognizable by its 1913 original fitted marble walls and rotunda, holds the title of being the third-largest museum of its type in the U.S., boasting more than 3.5 million specimens and counting. Free admission on the first Tuesday of most months, except July and August; free every Tuesday in September.
  12. Norton Simon Museum of Art: The permanent collection features European art from the Renaissance to the mid-20th century, including works by Raphael, Botticelli, Rubens, Rembrandt, Watteau, Goya, Monet, Renoir, Degas and van Gogh, and sculptures from India and Southeast Asia. Free admission on the first Friday of every month from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
  13. Skirball Cultural Center: At the Skirball, enjoy museum exhibitions — including the ever-popular Noah’s Ark at the Skirball — family programs, performing arts, world music, film, lectures, classes, dining, shopping and more. Free admission every Thursday.

Free admission information reprinted from LA Tourism & Convention Board, a GREAT resource for visitors AND residents of Los Angeles.

Jul 112013
 

Kitasono Katue: Surrealist Poet

LACMA Kitasono Katue Surrealist Poet

LACMA Kitasono Katue Surrealist Poet / Anything L.A.

Pavilion for Japanese Art
August 3, 2013–December 1, 2013

Kitasono Katue (1902–1978) was the best known Japanese poet-artist in Europe and the US during the middle half of the 20th century. This is the first solo exhibit of his art outside Japan.

LACMA Kitasono Katue Surrealist Poet

Image: Kitasono Katue, La Disparition d’Honoré Subrac (オノレ・シュウブラック氏の減形) (1960), gelatin silver print, 21 1/16 x 17 3/8 in. (53.5 x 44.1 cm). Collection of John Solt. © Hashimoto Sumiko. Used with permissio / Anything L.A.

At the beginning of his career, Kitasono hoped to be a painter, but immediately gained notice instead for his avant-garde poetry. Active from the mid-1920s as a pioneering avant-garde spirit, he made a priority of finding common ground with poets, artists and writers in Europe and the Americas.

First entranced by Dadaism and Surrealism, he also thoroughly absorbed the ideas of Futurism, Cubism, Abstract Expressionism and Minimalism. His poems were often published in poetry and visual art journals, and he served as an editor and graphic designer for some of these, including the journal VOU, published from 1935 to 1940, and then again from 1945 to 1978, ceasing at Kitasono’s death.

Kitasono edited and designed more than 500 magazines and poetry books during his life, and created numerous covers for novels, trade journals and commercial magazines. Plastic Poems, which fit in a category more broadly referred to as visual poetry, adorned many of his book covers; Kitasono began to produce Plastic Poetry after being inspired by the photographs done by members of the VOU group, principally Yamamoto Kansuke (1914-1987), whose finely conceived surrealistic work was often published in the magazine. In the last twelve years of his life, Kitasono continued to experiment with the limitless field of visual poetry, maintaining the clean form and finely conceived pairings of images seen in his earliest successful text poems.

Mar 232013
 

March 22 through April 6

OPENING NIGHT PROGRAM

LACMA Exhibition Film Series

Academy Film Archive Rediscovery: Saul Bass’s PHASE IV (1974)
with rarely seen original ending.

A box office disappointment in its initial release, “Phase IV” is being reappraised by modern audiences. This special presentation of a new 35mm print from the Academy Film Archive will include a rare screening of the original psychedelic ending sequence, long thought to be lost and alternately rumored never to have been made at all. This sequence was recently unearthed by the Archive and may be considered one of the most significant cinematic discoveries of the decade.

Featuring Academy Film Archive prints of two Saul Bass Films.

In 1968, “2001: A Space Odyssey” ushered in a bold new vision for science-fiction cinema that flowered fully in the coming decade as established filmmakers – among them Saul Bass, John Boorman, Robert Altman – as well as promising newcomers (such as George Lucas, John Carpenter and Douglas Trumbull) pushed the genre into adventurous new directions. Their films also addressed contemporary issues, such as technology’s rapid advancement, its encroachment into everyday life and mankind’s anxieties about its own (self) destruction. Series titles include “Silent Running,” “THX 1138,” “The Terminal Man,” “Dark Star,” “Solaris,” “Zardoz,” “Fantastic Planet,” “Quintet,” “The Man Who Fell to Earth” and the Academy Film Archive’s restored print of Saul Bass’s short “Quest.”

Mar 092013
 

This Weekend at LACMA: Free Family Activities, final days

of Expressionist Cinema, and More.

March  8 2013

This Weekend at LACMAYou may be losing an hour of your day this weekend to daylight savings time, but there are plenty of things to do at LACMA to ease this perennial pain.
Saturday is a perfect day for the curious explorer in all of us. LACMA has once again collaborated with the Charles White Elementary School Gallery near MacArthur Park (just five miles east of LACMA on Wilshire) to present the unique work of New York–based artist Shinique Smith. On Saturday, join LACMA at the Charles White Gallery for free drop-in family activities all day including tours of the exhibition, a scavenger hunt, and a life-drawing workshop with a costumed model. Or, if you’re closer to campus, bring your family to the museum for free, bilingual family tours of the collection on Saturday starting at 11 am.

Sunday is another excellent opportunity to spend time together at the museum during our free Andell Family Sundays. This week’s activities focus on “Fruit & Flowers on Fabric.” Then, in the afternoon, learn about traditional Korean ceramics and how they inspire contemporary artists today. Dr. Burglind Jungmann, professor of Korean art history at UCLA and curator of Life in Ceramics: Five Contemporary Korean Artists, will give the talk. By the evening, when you’re wondering where the weekend went, you can slow down and take a step back to enjoy the UCLA Philharmonia performing works by Mozart and Schumann at Sundays Live (always free!).

Oct 202012
 

 

THE ACADEMY UNVEILS VISION FOR NEW MUSEUM

BY ARCHITECTS RENZO PIANO AND ZOLTAN PALI ACADEMY MUSEUM OF MOTION PICTURES WILL

BE FIRST MAJOR MUSEUM IN U.S. DEDICATED EXCLUSIVELY TO THE ART, SCIENCE OF MOVIES

$100M RAISED TOWARD $250M CAPITAL CAMPAIGN GOAL

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced that it has reached its initial goal of $100 million toward a $250 million capital campaign to fund the upcoming Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Concurrently, the Academy unveiled its vision for the first major U.S. museum dedicated exclusively to the history and ongoing development of motion pictures. Designed by award-winning architects Renzo Piano and Zoltan Pali, the non-profit museum which will be located in the historic May Company Wilshire building in Los Angeles, is slated to open in 2016.Plans For a Museum of Motion Pictures

“The Academy museum will be a landmark that both our industry and our city can be immensely proud of,” said Academy CEO Dawn Hudson. “I appreciate the unwavering support of our board, our members, and especially our campaign chairs, all of whom have led us through this crucial stage.”

Launched in early 2012 by Campaign Chair Bob Iger and Co-Chairs Annette Bening and Tom Hanks, the campaign has raised $100 million through private donations towards a $250 million goal. “The early response to our fundraising campaign has been outstanding and is incredibly encouraging,” said Iger. “We are so grateful to the founding supporters of the campaign, who share our vision and passion for creating the Academy Museum.”

Located on the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) campus, the nearly 300,000 square-foot Academy Museum will revitalize the historic building, which has been vacant or underutilized for nearly 20 years, and weave it back into the fabric of the city.

The design fully restores the Wilshire and Fairfax street-front facades of the 1938 Streamline Moderne building, and includes a spherical glass addition at the back of the original building. Designed to represent the marriage of art and technology, the addition will house a state-of-the-art theater which replaces an extension made to the structure in 1946.

“The design for the museum will finally enable this wonderful building to be animated and contribute to the city after sitting empty for so long,” said Piano, the Pritzker Prize winning architect.  “I am very inspired by the Academy’s name and mission, the idea of the arts and sciences working together to create films. Our design will preserve the May Company building’s historic public profile while simultaneously signaling that the building is taking on a new life that celebrates both the industry and art form that this city created and gave to the world.”

“A major movie museum in the heart of this city has been a long-held dream of the Academy,” said Academy President Hawk Koch, “Thanks to the latest technological developments we can take the visiting public through time, back into our history and forward toward our future.”   Through immersive exhibitions and galleries, special screening rooms, and an interactive education center with demonstration labs, the museum will draw from the Academy’s extensive collections and archives, which include more than 140,000 films, 10 million photographs, 42,000 original film posters, 10,000 production drawings, costumes, props and movie-making equipment, as well as behind-the-scenes personal accounts from artists and innovators – the Academy’s membership – working in the motion picture industry.

“Hollywood has played an unparalleled role in bringing American art, culture and creativity to people around the world,” said Antonio Villaraigosa, mayor of Los Angeles. “The Academy Museum will be a remarkable resource for L.A. that will both celebrate the industry that has defined our city and provide an essential resource that reinforces our position as leader and innovator.”

The $100 million raised includes significant commitments from:

Campaign Chairs and their families: Annette Bening and Warren Beatty, Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson, and Bob Iger and Willow Bay Academy Governors, Past Presidents and their families, including: Bill Condon and Jack Morrissey, Richard and Bonnie Cook, Rob and Shari Friedman, Sid and Nancy Ganis, Jim and Ann Gianopulos, Gale Anne Hurd, Kathleen Kennedy and Frank Marshall, Hawk and Molly Koch, John and Nancy Lasseter, Walter Mirisch and Lawrence Mirisch, Bob and Kay Rehme, and Tom and Madeleine Sherak Corporate partners, including Dolby Laboratories, Panavision, Technicolor, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Entertainment Partners/Central Casting, Girard-Perregaux Watches, and The New York Times Film studios and entertainment conglomerates, including The Walt Disney Company, NBCUniversal, Sony Pictures Entertainment, Twentieth Century Fox, Warner Bros.

Entertainment, and Lionsgate Individuals and foundations, including Cecilia DeMille Presley, Lucasfilm Foundation, Shirley Temple Black and Family, Ken and Carol Schultz, The Mary Pickford Foundation, Alan and Cindy Horn, Frank and Fay Mancuso, Bob and Eva Shaye, The Four Friends Foundation, the Film Music Foundation, and Jerry and Linda Bruckheimer Industry guilds, including the Directors Guild of America, Producers Guild of America, SAG-AFTRA, and the Writers Guild of America, West. The Academy will also provide an endowment to support the Museum’s long-term programming.

“The Academy Museum will have a profound impact on the cultural landscape of Los Angeles. The decision to locate this museum in a historic building on LACMA’s campus will bring incredible benefits to both institutions and their visitors. It is a whole that is bigger than the sum of its parts,” said Zev Yaroslavsky, chairman of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors.

ABOUT THE ACADEMY The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is the world’s preeminent movie-related organization, with a membership of more than 6,000 of the most accomplished men and women working in cinema. In addition to the annual Academy Awards—in which the members vote to select the nominees and winners­—the Academy presents a diverse year-round slate of public programs, exhibitions and events; provides financial support to a wide range of other movie-related organizations and endeavors; acts as a neutral advocate in the advancement of motion picture technology; and, through its Margaret Herrick Library and Academy Film Archive, collects, preserves, restores and provides access to movies and items related to their history. Through these and other activities the Academy serves students, historians, the entertainment industry and people everywhere who love movies.

FOLLOW THE ACADEMY

www.oscars.org

www.facebook.com/TheAcademy

www.youtube.com/Oscars

www.twitter.com/TheAcademy

About Renzo Piano Building Workshop

The Renzo Piano Building Workshop is an interactive partnership that originated with the creative insight of Genoa-born architect Renzo Piano. Established in 1981, the Workshop has a team of 150 architects at offices in Genoa, Paris and New York. Our work strives for unusual and bold solutions, achieved through inventive use of technology, while emphasizing a respect for local cultural themes and a reliance on traditional materials and craftsmanship.

RPBW aims to blend these diverse and occasionally dissonant themes in a search for a new architectural voice—one that pays homage to the urbanity and humanity of space and form—within a broader context that seeks elegance and balance yet rejects the conventional constraints of formalism and traditional boundaries between disciplines.

Current projects include the Fogg Museum expansion at Harvard University in Cambridge, MA; the new Whitney Museum of American Art and Columbia University’s Manhattanville Campus in New York, NY; the Stavros Niarchos Cultural Center in Athens, Greece; and the Kimbell Art Museum expansion in Fort Worth, TX. Past projects include the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, France; the Beyeler Foundation Museum in Basel, Switzerland; the Menil Collection in Houston, TX; the New York Times Building in New York, NY; the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, CA; the High Museum of Art expansion in Atlanta, GA; the Chicago Art Institute expansion Chicago, IL; and the Broad Contemporary Art Museum, LACMA expansion in Los Angeles, CA.

About Studio Pali Fekete

Zoltan E. Pali founded Studio Pali Fekete architects (SPF:a) with partner Judit M. Fekete LEED AP in 1988 with the mission of generating architecture that fuses forces of site, program, budget, nature, and culture.  Although they have become proficient in working with historically designated buildings, their approach is decidedly modern, having both been mentored by the LA modernist and original LA12 designee, Jerrold E. Lomax, FAIA, an associate of Craig Ellwood. Notable projects have included restoration work on the Hollywood Pantages Theatre, the Greek Theatre and Gibson Amphitheatre, and Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, which have resulted in numerous accolades, including the Preservation Award from the Los Angeles Conservancy.

The firm was executive architect on a $300 million renovation and expansion project at Getty Villa Museum in Malibu that included the new Getty Conservation Institute, the Fleischmann Amphitheatre, the Villa Auditorium and restoration of the original Villa Museum and Getty Ranch House.

Most recently, they worked with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art on LACMA West, a 300,000-square foot adaptive reuse of a historic department store into museum galleries, offices, media libraries and other flexible program space. In 2005, Pali was inducted as one of the youngest members of the AIA’s College of Fellows.

Aug 162012
 

LACMA and The Academy Present First Stanley Kubrick Retrospective in the United States

Stanley Kubrick Retrospectve

(Left) A Clockwork Orange, (A Clockwork Orange, GB/United States 1970-71). Alex DeLarge (Malcolm McDowell) in the Korova milk bar. © Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.
(Center) During the filming of Spartacus (United States 1959–60) in Spain.
© Universal Studios Inc.
(Right) The Shining (Shining, GB/USA 1980). The daughters of former caretaker Grady (Lisa and Louise Burns). © Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (The Academy) are pleased to co-present the first U.S. retrospective of filmmaker Stanley Kubrick, developed in collaboration with the Kubrick Estate and the Deutsches Filmmuseum, Frankfurt. The exhibition provides access to the director’s extraordinary vision and working methods while illuminating the network of influences and conditions that came together to make his films universally regarded as modern masterpieces. The Los Angeles presentation is made possible by a generous gift from Steve Tisch.

“By featuring this legendary filmmaker and his oeuvre in his first retrospective within the context of an art museum, Stanley Kubrick will reevaluate how we define the artist in the twenty-first century, and simultaneously expand upon LACMA’s commitment to exploring the intersection of art and film,” said Michael Govan, CEO and Wallis Annenberg Director of LACMA. “We are also pleased to honor Kubrick’s impact on film and art history at our 2012 Art + Film Gala, along with artist Ed Ruscha, on October 27.”

“Stanley Kubrick represents the perfect opportunity to collaborate with LACMA on the presentation of film in a museum setting,” said Dawn Hudson, Academy CEO. “It is a taste of things to come when we open the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in the historic Wilshire May Company building on the LACMA campus.”

LACMA trustee Steve Tisch said, “I am glad to support this important retrospective of one of the greatest filmmakers of all time. This is one more example of LACMA’s commitment to film as an art form, along with past exhibitions like Tim Burton and Dalí: Painting & Film and recent acquisitions like Christian Marclay’s The Clock.”

Kubrick’s acclaimed repertoire of films, including Paths of Glory, Lolita, Dr. Strangelove, 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange, The Shining, Full Metal Jacket, and Eyes Wide Shut, among others, highlights not only his signature directorial tenacity but also major technological innovations of the time, such as filming by candlelight in Barry Lyndon and utilizing the front projection effect in 2001. The exhibition also includes an alternate beginning to this seminal science fiction film.

Kubrick’s films will be represented through a thoughtful selection of archival material, annotated scripts, photography, costumes, cameras and equipment, set models, original promotional materials, and props. The interdisciplinary exhibition draws attention to Kubrick’s fixation with historical research and his visionary adaptations of influences from the fine arts, design, and architecture, and enables visitors to experience the cinematic journey of one of the great artists of the twentieth century. The exhibition also includes sections dedicated to projects that were never completed, as well as to the special effects (visual and auditory) developed by Kubrick and his team.

Terry Semel, co-chair of LACMA’s board of trustees, said “I had the great privilege of working with Stanley on many of his films, including Barry Lyndon, The Shining, Full Metal Jacket, and Eyes Wide Shut. I am thrilled to see his work honored in a museum setting.”

Hawk Koch, Academy president, said “This is a major step in the Academy’s plan to create a premier movie museum in Los Angeles. We are pleased to co-present this retrospective with LACMA which will provide visitors the opportunity to experience Kubrick’s iconic work as well as his influence on our culture.”

The exhibition will be accompanied by a film retrospective at LACMA’s Bing Theater beginning in November, as well as public programs and conversations with Kubrick’s collaborators and people he influenced, and additional exhibition-related film series planned for spring 2013.

As part of this partnership, and to kick off the film retrospective, on Wednesday, November 7, the Academy will present “An Academy Salute to Stanley Kubrick.” The evening will feature film clips and a conversation hosted by actor Malcolm McDowell. Special guests will include Kubrick’s colleagues and collaborators. The event will also launch the Academy’s Kubrick exhibition, which will be open to the public through February 2013. Featuring items from the Academy’s permanent collection, the exhibition will illuminate the work of Kubrick’s collaborators, as well as the many artists who influenced Kubrick’s work. The salute and exhibition will take place at the Academy’s Samuel Golden Theater and Grand Lobby in Beverly Hills, respectively.

Stanley Kubrick originated at Deutches Filmmuseum, Frankfurt, and has since traveled to Berlin, Melbourne, Ghent, Zurich, Rome, Paris, and Amsterdam. The exhibition presentation at LACMA will be dramatically different from the international venues, with exhibition design by film production designer Patti Podesta.

Credit This exhibition was organized by the Deutsches Filmmuseum, Frankfurt am Main, Christiane Kubrick, and The Stanley Kubrick Archive at University of the Arts London, with the support of Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc., Sony-Columbia Pictures Industries Inc., Metro Goldwyn Mayer Studios Inc., Universal Studios Inc., and SK Film Archives LLC.

In Los Angeles, Stanley Kubrick is co-presented by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and was generously supported by Steve Tisch. Additional funding was provided by Warner Bros. Entertainment, Violet Spitzer-Lucas and the Spitzer Family Foundation.

Stanley Kubrick Biography Stanley Kubrick was born in 1928 in New York City. In 1945, at the age of 16, Kubrick had his first photograph published in Look magazine. As a staff photographer at Look from 1946 to 1951, Kubrick took on a range of assignments, photographing both celebrity subjects and urban documentaries. He made his first film short, Day of the Fight, in 1951; after directing two more shorts, Kubrick directed and produced his first feature-length film, Fear and Desire, in 1953. Since then, Kubrick followed with such films as Paths of Glory, Spartacus, Lolita, Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange, Barry Lyndon, The Shining, Full Metal Jacket, and Eyes Wide Shut. A pioneer in special effects and technological advances, Kubrick’s films often included the use of new photographic lenses, long tracking sequences, and orchestral music. With thirteen Academy Award nominations, Kubrick won the Oscar for Best Effects for 2001: A Space Odyssey in 1969. Kubrick died in Harpenden, England, on March 7, 1999, at the age of 70.

ABOUT THE ACADEMY The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is the world’s preeminent movie-related organization, with a membership of more than 6,000 of the most accomplished men and women working in cinema. In addition to the annual Academy Awards — in which the members vote to select the nominees and winners — the Academy presents a diverse year-round slate of public programs, exhibitions and events; provides financial support to a wide range of other movie-related organizations and endeavors; acts as a neutral advocate in the advancement of motion picture technology; and, through its Margaret Herrick Library and Academy Film Archive, collects, preserves, restores and provides access to movies and items related to their history. Through these and other activities the Academy serves students, historians, the entertainment industry and people everywhere who love movies.

FOLLOW THE ACADEMY

About LACMA Since its inception in 1965, LACMA has been devoted to collecting works of art that span both history and geography-and represent Los Angeles’s uniquely diverse population. Today, the museum features particularly strong collections of Asian, Latin American, European, and American art, as well as a contemporary museum on its campus. With this expanded space for contemporary art, innovative collaborations with artists, and an ongoing Transformation project, LACMA is creating a truly modern lens through which to view its rich encyclopedic collection.

Location and Contact: 5905 Wilshire Boulevard (at Fairfax Avenue), Los Angeles, CA, 90036 | 323 857-6000 | lacma.org

Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday: 11 am–5 pm; Friday: 11 am–8 pm; Saturday, Sunday: 10 am–7 pm; closed Wednesday

General Admission: Adults: $15; students 18+ with ID and senior citizens 62+: $10

Free General Admission: Members; children 17 and under; after 3 pm weekdays for L.A. County residents; second Tuesday of every month; Target Free Holiday Mondays