Feb 132017
 
Emergency Order For Oroville Dam Area

Photo property of PBS.org

Governor Brown Issues Emergency Order to Help Response to Situation at Oroville Dam

 

UPDATE: Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. issued the following statement today (02/14/17) after the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) approved both recent gubernatorial requests for federal assistance – one to support the response to the situation at Oroville Dam and the other to help with the impacts of January storms:

“I want to thank FEMA for moving quickly to approve our requests. This federal aid will get money and resources where it’s needed most.”

Yesterday, Governor Brown met with emergency response officials and sent a letter to the President and FEMA requesting a Presidential Emergency Declaration for Direct Federal Assistance to support the communities impacted by the situation at the Oroville Dam’s emergency spillway. Separately, last Friday, Governor Brown requested a Presidential Major Disaster Declaration for the state to bolster ongoing state and local recovery efforts following January storms that caused additional flooding, mudslides, erosion, power outages and damage to critical infrastructure across California.

On Sunday, Governor Brown declared a state of emergency to bolster the state’s response to the situation in Oroville and support local evacuations. The Governor’s Office of Emergency Services has also activated the State Operations Center in Mather, California to its highest level and is coordinating with personnel at the Incident Command Post in Oroville, California and with other local, state and federal emergency response officials to address all emergency management needs.

*

The Oroville Dam in Northern California is filled to capacity by the recent wave of rain storms. Due to the weight of the water as well as the age and condition of the dam, a hole has developed in the auxiliary spillway of the reservoir making it risky to attempt lowering water levels. (The hole was discovered on Sunday 02/12/17, a day after the spillway was used for the first time.)

Without the ability to control water levels the Dam is at risk of overflowing and releasing massive amounts of water from Lake Oroville into the Feather River flooding widespread areas endangering lives and property.

The situation caused Governor Brown to issue immediate evacuation order for flood threatened communities. National Weather Service also urged residents to evacuate. Tens of thousands have been evacuated from towns below the Oroville Dam in Yuba, Butte and Sutter counties. (Some sources put the number at 100,000.) Seven Yuba area Sikh Temples have offered temporary housing to evacuees.

The Governor put the entire 23,000 member strong California National Guard on alert should the feared disaster occur.

As of Monday morning, the threat appears to be less severe. There are plans to fill the hole with rocks which would make the emergency spillway functional – and capable of releasing excess water at a measured rate – again.

*

Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. issued an emergency order on Sunday 02/12/17 to bolster the state’s response to the situation at the Oroville Dam’s auxiliary spillway and support subsequent local evacuations.

“I’ve been in close contact with emergency personnel managing the situation in Oroville throughout the weekend and it’s clear the circumstances are complex and rapidly changing,” said Governor Brown. “I want to thank local and state law enforcement for leading evacuation efforts and doing their part to keep residents safe. The state is directing all necessary personnel and resources to deal with this very serious situation.”

The Governor’s Office of Emergency Services has activated the State Operations Center in Mather, California to its highest level and is coordinating with personnel at the Incident Command Post in Oroville, California and with other local, state and federal emergency response officials to address all emergency management, evacuation and mutual aid needs.

1. All citizens should heed the advice of emergency officials with regard to this emergency in order to protect their safety.

2. All agencies of the state government utilize and employ state personnel, equipment, and facilities for the performance of any and all activities consistent with the direction of the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services and the State Emergency Plan.

3. As necessary to assist local governments and for the protection of public health and the environment, state agencies shall enter into contracts to arrange for the procurement of materials, goods, and services necessary to quickly remove dangerous debris, repair damaged resources, and restore and protect the impacted watershed. Applicable provisions of the Government Code and the Public Contract Code, including but not limited to travel, advertising, and competitive bidding requirements, are suspended to the extent necessary to address the effects of this flooding.

4. The California National Guard shall mobilize under California Military and Veterans Code section 146 to support disaster response and relief efforts and coordinate with all relevant state agencies, including the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services, and all relevant state and local emergency responders and law enforcement within the impacted areas. Pursuant to section 147 of the California Military and Veterans Code, any and all provisions of Division 2 of the Military and Veterans Code or other laws of the State which require advertisement for bids for purchases of supplies or employment of services are suspended to the extent necessary to address the effects of this flooding.

5. In order to expedite response and recovery, Division 13 (commencing with section 21000) of the Public Resources Code and regulations adopted pursuant to that Division are hereby suspended.

6. The Office of Emergency Services shall provide assistance to Butte, Sutter and Yuba Counties, as appropriate, under the authority of the California Disaster Assistance Act, California Government Code section 8680 et seq. and California Code of Regulations, title 19, section 2900 et seq.

I FURTHER DIRECT that as soon as hereafter possible, this proclamation be filed in the Office of the Secretary of State and that widespread publicity and notice be given of this proclamation.

 

 

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Jan 252017
 
Governor Brown Delivers 2017 State of the State Address

Governor Brown delivers 2016 state of the state address.
Photo Credit: Joe McHugh, California Highway Patrol

Governor Brown Delivers 2017 State of the State Address:
“California is Not Turning Back, Not Now, Not Ever”

Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. today delivered his State of the State address, departing with the traditional practice of listing every issue and restating every priority to focus on the “broader context of our country and its challenges.”

In his remarks the Governor vowed to “defend everybody – every man, woman and child – who has come here…and has contributed to the well-being of our state” and committed to protecting the state’s gains on immigration, health care and climate change, guided by the principles that make California “the Great Exception” – truth, civility and perseverance.

Citing the English poet John Donne, the Governor made it clear that California is not an island and America’s future is inextricably tied to California’s future: “When California does well, America does well. And when California hurts, America hurts.”

Below is the text as prepared for delivery:

Edmund G. Brown Jr.
State of the State Address
Remarks as Prepared
January 24, 2017

“Thank you. Thank you for all that energy and enthusiasm. It is just what we need for the battle ahead. So keep it up and don’t ever falter.

This is California, the sixth most powerful economy in the world. One out of every eight Americans lives right here and 27 percent – almost eleven million – were born in a foreign land.

When California does well, America does well. And when California hurts, America hurts.

As the English poet, John Donne, said almost 400 years ago:

“No man is an island entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main…And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.”

A few moments ago, I swore into office our new attorney general. Like so many others, he is the son of immigrants who saw California as a place where, through grit and determination, they could realize their dreams. And they are not alone, millions of Californians have come here from Mexico and a hundred other countries, making our state what it is today: vibrant, even turbulent, and a beacon of hope to the rest of the world.

We don’t have a Statue of Liberty with its inscription: “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free…” But we do have the Golden Gate and a spirit of adventure and openness that has welcomed – since the Gold Rush of 1848 – one wave of immigration after another.

For myself, I feel privileged to stand before you as your governor, as did my father almost sixty years ago. His mother, Ida, the youngest of eight children, was born in very modest circumstances, not very far from where we are gathered today. Her father arrived in California in 1852, having left from the Port of Hamburg, aboard a ship named “Perseverance.”

It is that spirit of perseverance and courage which built our state from the beginning. And it is that spirit which will get us through the great uncertainty and the difficulties ahead.

It is customary on an occasion like this to lay out a specific agenda for the year ahead. Six times before from this rostrum, I have done that, and in some detail. And, as I reread those proposals set forth in previous State of the State speeches, I was amazed to see how much we have accomplished together.

We have:

  • Increased – by tens of billions – support for our public schools and universities.
  • Provided health insurance to over five million more Californians.
  • Raised the minimum wage.
  • Reduced prison overcrowding and reformed our system of crime and punishment.
  • Made California a world leader in the fight against climate change.
  • Passed a water bond.
  • Built up a rainy day fund.
  • And closed a huge $27 billion deficit.
  • And during the last seven years, California has reduced the unemployment rate from 12.1 percent to 5.2 percent and created almost 2.5 million jobs. And that’s not all.

But this morning it is hard for me to keep my thoughts just on California. The recent election and inauguration of a new President have shown deep divisions across America.

While no one knows what the new leaders will actually do, there are signs that are disturbing. We have seen the bald assertion of “alternative facts.” We have heard the blatant attacks on science. Familiar signposts of our democracy – truth, civility, working together – have been obscured or swept aside.

But on Saturday, in cities across the country, we also witnessed a vast and inspiring fervor that is stirring in the land. Democracy doesn’t come from the top; it starts and spreads in the hearts of the people. And in the hearts of Americans, our core principles are as strong as ever.

So as we reflect on the state of our state, we should do so in the broader context of our country and its challenges. We must prepare for uncertain times and reaffirm the basic principles that have made California the Great Exception that it is.

First, in California, immigrants are an integral part of who we are and what we’ve become. They have helped create the wealth and dynamism of this state from the very beginning.

I recognize that under the Constitution, federal law is supreme and that Washington determines immigration policy. But as a state we can and have had a role to play. California has enacted several protective measures for the undocumented: the Trust Act, lawful driver’s licenses, basic employment rights and non-discriminatory access to higher education.

We may be called upon to defend those laws and defend them we will. And let me be clear: we will defend everybody – every man, woman and child – who has come here for a better life and has contributed to the well-being of our state.

My second point relates to health care. More than any other state, California embraced the Affordable Care Act and over five million people now enjoy its benefits. But that coverage has come with tens of billions of federal dollars. Were any of that to be taken away, our state budget would be directly affected, possibly devastated. That is why I intend to join with other governors – and with you – to do everything we can to protect the health care of our people.

Third, our state is known the world over for the actions we have taken to encourage renewable energy and combat climate change.

Whatever they do in Washington, they can’t change the facts. And these are the facts: the climate is changing, the temperatures are rising and so are the oceans. Natural habitats everywhere are under increasing stress. The world knows this.

One hundred and ninety-four countries signed the Paris Agreement to control greenhouse gases. Our own voluntary agreement to accomplish the same goal – the “Under Two M.O.U.” – has 165 signatories, representing a billion people.

We cannot fall back and give in to the climate deniers. The science is clear. The danger is real.

We can do much on our own and we can join with others – other states and provinces and even countries, to stop the dangerous rise in climate pollution. And we will.

Fourth is infrastructure. This is a topic where the President has stated his firm intention to build and build big.

In his inaugural address, he said: “We will build new roads, and highways, and bridges, and airports, and tunnels, and railways all across our wonderful nation.”

And in this, we can all work together – here in Sacramento and in Washington as well. We have roads and tunnels and railroads and even a dam that the President could help us with. And that will create good-paying American jobs.

As we face the hard journey ahead, we will have to summon, as Abraham Lincoln said, “the better angels of our nature.” Above all else, we have to live in the truth.

We all have our opinions but for democracy to work, we have to trust each other. We have to strive to understand the facts and state them clearly as we argue our points of view. As Hugo Grotius, the famous Dutch jurist, said long ago, “even God cannot cause two times two not to make four.”

When the science is clear or when our own eyes tell us that the seats in this chamber are filled or that the sun is shining, we must say so, not construct some alternate universe of non-facts that we find more pleasing.

Along with truth, we must practice civility. Although we have disagreed – often along party lines – we have generally been civil to one another and avoided the rancor of Washington. I urge you to go even further and look for new ways to work beyond party and act as Californians first.

Democrats are in the majority, but Republicans represent real Californians too. We went beyond party when we reformed workers’ compensation, when we created a rainy day fund and when we passed the water bond.

Let’s do that again and set an example for the rest of the country. And, in the process, we will earn the trust of the people of California.

And then there is perseverance. It is not an accident that the sailing ship that brought my great-grandfather to America was named “Perseverance.” That is exactly what it took to endure the dangerous and uncertain months at sea, sailing from Germany to America.

While we now face different challenges, make no mistake: the future is uncertain and dangers abound. Whether it’s the threat to our budget, or to undocumented Californians, or to our efforts to combat climate change – or even more global threats such as a financial meltdown or a nuclear incident or terrorist attack – this is a time which calls out for courage and for perseverance. I promise you both.

But let’s remember as well that after the perilous voyage, those who made it to America found boundless opportunity. And so will we.

Let me end in the immortal words of Woody Guthrie:

“This land is your land, this land is my land
From California to the New York Island
From the Redwood Forest, to the Gulf Stream waters
This land was made for you and me…

Nobody living can ever stop me,
As I go walking that freedom highway;
Nobody living can ever make me turn back
This land was made for you and me.”

California is not turning back. Not now, not ever.”

*

From Anything L.A. Magazine:

  • Yes, to affordable education!
  • Yes, to affordable health insurance!
  • Yes, to living wages!
  • Yes, to human rights!
  • Yes, to climate control!
  • Yes, to a healthy economy!

Governor Brown takes on President Trump and defends the values California stands for (as last week’s Women’s March in Los Angeles has shown). Thank you Governor Brown: we spoke up and you heard us!

Anything L.A. Magazine is 100% behind our Great Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. who DIDN’T mellow with age. We are prouder than ever to be Californians!

 

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Jan 022017
 

New California Laws For 2017

California government, with Governor Brown at the steering wheel, worked tirelessly to introduce, pass and sign 898 new laws. The laws treat into effect in 2017. We are obviously not going to discuss all of them here but here are a few worth noting.

Holding a cellphone or any other wireless electronic device while driving is illegal and punishable by law starting in 2017. From now on any such devices have to be mounted in front of the driver (without obstructing the view of the road, of course) and only a single swipe / single tap feature or function activation is allowed while driving.

Vehicle registration fees are rising on all vehicles and trailers.

Minimum wage is going up (for those employed by businesses with 26 or more employees) from $10 to $10.50 per hour. The minimum wage is to gradually increase and reach $15 per hour in 2022.

No more statute of limitation on rape. In 2017 California joins the 16 States that don’t have statute of limitations on rape. (13 additional States vary on the definition of rape.) Until now California’s law limited the time for prosecution of a felony sex offense to 10 years, the sole exception: the emergence of new DNA evidence. For Californians, the new law means more hope for justice for rape victims. (The law applies to rapes committed after January 1st 2017.)

Good mood while pampered is allowed: free wine and beer can be legally served to customers in hair salons and barbers shops before 10 pm.

Stocking EpiPens by businesses is legal. Businesses, educational institutions, entertainment venues and such prepared for EpiPens’ use in cases of life-threatening allergic reactions can now buy and stock it legally.

We have the Right-To-Die. The law makes death-on-demand legal for terminally-ill patients and legalizes physicians’ assistance for patients who choose to die.

The last one – technically doesn’t belong on this list – but yes, recreational marijuana use became legal in California in 2017 and some Angelenos simply couldn’t contain their joy…..

L.A. celebrates legalization of recreational marijuana use

California is making progress in safety, security, justice and healthcare. (Not to mention our commitment to delaying climate change, renewable fuels and environmental protection.) Happy New Year!

Additional information on specific California laws is available on http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/
Full information on new California laws for 2017 is supposed to be available here
http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/newLawTemplate.xhtml but isn’t, hopefully it will be soon.

 

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Dec 162016
 
Gov. Brown On Climate Change: "We Will Persevere"

Governor Brown addresses scientists at American Geophysical Union fall meeting. Photo Credit: Joe McHugh, California Highway Patrol.

 

Governor Brown to Climate Scientists: “We Will Persevere”

 

Rallying thousands of scientists at one of the largest international gatherings of its kind, Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. today called on the scientific community – the “truth-tellers” and “truth seekers” – to mobilize for the climate fight.

“The time has never been more urgent or your work never more important. The climate is changing, temperatures are rising, oceans are becoming more acidified, habitats are under stress – the world is facing tremendous danger,” said Governor Brown at the American Geophysical Union’s annual fall meeting in San Francisco. “It’ll be up to you as truth-tellers, truth seekers to mobilize all your efforts to fight back. We’ve got a lot of firepower. We’ve got the scientists, we’ve got the universities, we have the national labs and we have the political clout and sophistication for the battle – and we will persevere. Have no doubt about that.”

“We will pursue a path of collaboration and bold political advancement – whatever they do in Washington – and eventually the truth will prevail,” Governor Brown continued. “This is not a battle of one day or one election. This is a long-term slog into the future and you are there, the foot soldiers of change and understanding and scientific collaboration.”

Governor Brown’s remarks follow the action to prevent further coastal oil and gas drilling, reduce ocean acidity and boost renewable energy development in California. In recent weeks, Governor Brown issued a joint release with the governors of Oregon and Washington and the premier of British Columbia reaffirming their commitment to climate action at the close of COP22. The Governor also announced 29 new members to the Under2 Coalition, an international climate pact formed by California and Baden-Württemberg, Germany among cities, states and countries to limit the increase in global average temperature to below 2 degrees Celsius, the level of potentially catastrophic consequences. A total of 165 jurisdictions have now joined the coalition representing more than a billion people and $25.7 trillion in combined GDP – more than one-third of the global economy.

California’s Leadership on Climate Change
California is playing a world-leading role in setting aggressive climate goals, broadening collaboration among subnational leaders and taking action to reduce climate pollutants.

In September, California took bold action to advance its climate goals, establishing the most ambitious greenhouse gas emission reduction targets in North America and the nation’s toughest restrictions on destructive super pollutants. The Governor also signed legislation that directs cap-and-trade funds to greenhouse gas reducing programs which benefit disadvantaged communities, support clean transportation and protect natural ecosystems.

This action builds on landmark legislation the Governor signed in October 2015 to generate half of the state’s electricity from renewable sources by 2030 and double the rate of energy efficiency savings in California buildings. Governor Brown has also committed to reducing today’s petroleum use in cars and trucks by up to 50 percent within the next 15 years; make heating fuels cleaner; and manage farm and rangelands, forests and wetlands so they can store carbon.

Over the past year and a half, the Governor has traveled to the United Nations headquarters in New York, the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris, France, the Vatican in Italy and the Climate Summit of the Americas in Toronto, Canada to call on other leaders to join California in the fight against climate change. Governor Brown also joined an unprecedented alliance of heads of state, city and state leaders – convened by the World Bank Group and International Monetary Fund – to urge countries and companies around the globe to put a price on carbon.

These efforts to broaden collaboration among subnational leaders build on a number of other international climate change agreements with leaders from the Czech Republic, the Netherlands, Mexico, China, North America, Japan, Israel, Peru and Chile and Governor Brown’s efforts to gather hundreds of world-renowned researchers and scientists around a groundbreaking call to action – called the consensus statement – which translates key scientific climate findings from disparate fields into one unified document.

The impacts of climate change are already being felt in California and will disproportionately impact the state’s most vulnerable populations.

From the editors of Anything L.A. Magazine: we are journalists not lawyers, and admittedly, we don’t know whether California’s commitment to slowing down global warming can in fact prevail against the federal government. But – as Angelenos – we are immensely proud of California’s Governor. Governor Jerry Brown – in spite of his age – is progressive and his heart is in the right place. I believe that I speak for the overwhelming majority of Californians as I express our sincere gratitude. Few leaders have the gift of courage and foresight, our Governor does.

 

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Oct 152016
 

Two Police Officers Killed In Palm Springs

On Saturday, 10/08/16 Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. issued the following statement regarding the deaths of Palm Springs Police Department Officers Jose Gilbert Vega and Lesley Zerebny:

“Officers Vega and Zerebny were killed today doing what they do every day – protecting their community. We grieve with the family members, friends and fellow officers coping with this senseless tragedy. Anne and I join all Californians in offering our heartfelt condolences.”
Officers Vega and Zerebny were fatally shot today while responding to a family disturbance at a home in Palm Springs. A third officer was also shot and is receiving treatment at a hospital.

Officer Vega, 63, was a 35-year veteran of the Palm Springs Police Department and was scheduled to retire in two months. He is survived by his wife and eight children.

Officer Zerebny, 27, served with the Palm Springs Police Department for one and a half years. She is survived by her husband and four-month-old daughter.

In honor of Officers Vega and Zerebny, Capitol flags will be flown at half-staff.

UPDATE: 26-year-old John Felix, a known gang member who served time for attempted murder, is being charged with the murder of the two slain police officers.

Sep 202016
 
Super Pollutant Restrictions For Healthier California

Governor Brown after signing the nation’s toughest super pollutant restrictions into law. Photo Credit: California State Senate.

Governor Brown Signs Nation’s Toughest Super Pollutant Restrictions into Law

On 09/19/2016 Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. signed SB 1383 by Senator Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens), which establishes the nation’s toughest restrictions on destructive super pollutants including black carbon, fluorinated gases and methane. If followed worldwide, these acts would help cut the projected rate of global warming in half by 2050.

“Cutting black carbon and other super pollutants is the critical next step in our program to combat climate change,” said Governor Brown at a signing ceremony near a Long Beach playground bordered by oil refinery smokestacks. “This bill curbs these dangerous pollutants and thereby protects public health and slows climate change.”

SB 1383 reduces the emission of super pollutants (also known as short-lived climate pollutants) and promotes renewable gas by requiring a 50 percent reduction in black carbon and 40 percent reduction in methane and hydrofluorocarbon from 2013 levels by 2030. Sources of these super pollutants include petroleum-based transportation fuels, agriculture, waste disposal and synthetic gases used in refrigeration, air conditioning and aerosol products.

“The Super Pollutants addressed in this bill – black carbon, methane, and HFC gases – are powerful climate forcers that have a profound effect on climate change and global warming,” said Senator Lara. “They also have detrimental effects on public health. This bill represents a unique opportunity to balance our global vision for the future with a much more local and immediate perspective. With these bold and ambitious goals, we’ll continue to set the standard for climate policy worldwide. And most importantly, those changes will be felt right here in California and reflected in the health of our children and future generations to come.”

Super pollutants have more potent heat-trapping effects but remain in the atmosphere for a shorter time than carbon dioxide. Reducing these pollutants can have a more immediate beneficial impact on climate change – and communities. Removing one ton of diesel black carbon from the atmosphere, for example, is equivalent to removing 1,000 to 2,000 tons of carbon dioxide pollution. Worldwide, methane emissions alone are responsible for approximately 20 percent of current global warming.

“The policies that California is implementing, if achieved worldwide, would cut the expected rate of global warming in half by 2050, save millions of lives, avoid millions of tons of crop losses per year and slow dangerous climate feedbacks such as melting ice caps and rising sea levels,” said San Diego Scripps Institution of Oceanography Distinguished Professor Dr. Veerabhadran Ramanathan. “The benefits of such a policy can far exceed the cost of enacting it.”

California’s ongoing efforts to improve air quality and address climate change have already led to important reductions in super pollutants, and have provided a strong foundation for today’s legislation. SB 605 by Senator Lara, signed by Governor Brown in 2014, directed the California Air Resources Board to develop a comprehensive strategy for addressing super pollutants, which ultimately included reduction targets now set forth in this legislation. During last year’s Climate Week in New York, the Governor gave remarks at an event hosted by the United Nations Environment Programme, where he outlined goals for cutting super pollutants that are now codified by today’s legislation.

One hundred and thirty-five jurisdictions representing 32 countries and six continents, or more than a quarter of the global economy, have signed or endorsed an agreement spearheaded by California to take actions to limit the increase in global average temperature to below 2 degrees Celsius – the warming threshold at which scientists say there will likely be catastrophic climate disruptions. These Under2Coalition signatories seek to achieve these goals through a range of activities including reductions in short-lived climate pollutants like black carbon.

Many of the benefits of cutting super pollutants in California will accrue in the most disadvantaged parts of the state, where pollution levels and health impacts are often highest. Every $1 spent on cutting air pollution, particularly super pollutants, creates approximately $30 in public health benefit.

“Reducing short-lived pollutants is the right thing to do for public health and for environmental justice,” said Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon. “By taking on harmful super pollutants like black carbon, methane, and hydrofluorocarbons, SB 1383 is another critical tool in our efforts to prevent and mitigate the dangerous effects of climate change. With this bill, California is once again leading the way for the nation and the world.”

For full text of the bill, visit: http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov

California’s Leadership on Climate Change

While California emits around 1 percent of the world’s greenhouse gases, the state is playing a leading role in broadening collaboration among subnational leaders and reducing climate pollutants.

California has cut black carbon emissions by more than 90 percent since the 1960s, has the nation’s strongest standards for limiting methane emissions from landfills and strictly regulates emissions from refrigerants, air conditioning and consumer products.

Last October, Governor Brown signed landmark legislation – SB 350 – to double the rate of energy efficiency savings in California buildings and generate half of the state’s electricity from renewable sources by 2030. Governor Brown also committed to reduce today’s petroleum use in cars and trucks by up to 50 percent within the next 15 years; make heating fuels cleaner; reduce the release of methane, black carbon and other potent pollutants across industries; and manage farm and rangelands, forests and wetlands so they can store carbon.

In the past year, the Governor has traveled to the United Nations headquarters in New York, the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris, the Vatican in Italy and the Climate Summit of the Americas in Toronto, Canada to call on other leaders to join California in the fight against climate change. Governor Brown also joined an unprecedented alliance of heads of state, city and state leaders – convened by the World Bank Group and International Monetary Fund – to urge countries and companies around the globe to put a price on carbon.

These efforts build on a number of other international climate change agreements with leaders from the Czech Republic, the Netherlands, Mexico, China, North America, Japan, Israel, Peru and Chile and Governor Brown’s efforts to convene hundreds of world-renowned researchers and scientists around a groundbreaking call to action – called the consensus statement – which translates key scientific climate findings from disparate fields into one unified document.

Additionally, the Governor issued an executive order last year to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in California 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030, a goal which is now codified by historic legislation the Governor recently signed that sets the most ambitious greenhouse gas reduction targets in North America. The Governor also signed legislation that directs cap-and-trade funds to greenhouse gas reducing programs which benefit disadvantaged communities, support clean transportation and protect natural ecosystems.

Sep 092016
 

governorbrownsignshistoricclimatechangelegislation

California Sets Most Ambitious Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets in North America

Ten years after California adopted the toughest greenhouse gas emission reduction goals in the nation, Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. today strengthened that commitment, signing SB 32 by Senator Fran Pavley (D-Agoura Hills) and AB 197 by Assemblymember Eduardo Garcia (D-Coachella), which require the state to cut emissions at least 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030 and invest in the communities hardest hit by climate change.

“Climate change is real, and knowing that, California is taking action,” said Governor Brown. “SB 32 and AB 197 are far-reaching moves that continue California on its path of vast innovation and environmental resilience.”

Governor Brown signed the legislation from the Vista Hermosa Natural Park, a 10-acre urban wilderness project built atop an old oil field and the first public park built in more than 100 years in the densely populated western edge of downtown Los Angeles.

California is on track to meet or exceed the current target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, as established in the California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (AB 32). The new 2030 requirement in SB 32 will help make it possible to reach the ultimate goal of reducing emissions 80 percent under 1990 levels by 2050.

“With its Clean Car Law in 2002 and the Global Warming Solutions Act in 2006, California took a global lead in adopting policies to clear the air, transition to clean energy and reduce climate pollution,” said Senator Pavley. “Those policies have fueled billions of dollars in private investment and spawned a thriving clean-energy sector. SB 32 sends an unmistakable message that California is resolute in its commitment to remain on that healthy and prosperous course.”

“In order for California to remain an economic and environmental leader the state will need to also be a trailblazer on issues related to equity,” said Assemblymember Garcia. “Placing the health and economic impacts of climate policy on vulnerable populations second will stunt the state’s prosperity.”

AB 197 establishes a legislative committee on climate change policies to help continue to ensure the state’s actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions are conducted with transparency and accountability.

“Today is a proud day for California,” said Senate President pro Tempore De León. “Together we redoubled our commitment to global climate leadership and building the clean energy economy of tomorrow, while ensuring environmental justice so all Californians benefit from our climate policies.”

“SB 32 extends California’s landmark greenhouse gas reduction goals. AB 197 changes the game on how we make sure those goals are reached,” said Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon. “The successful effort behind these two bills is the latest sign of a growing consensus that protecting the environment and improving public health are inextricably linked and that maintaining that link is key to advancing future environmental actions. The Assembly – where AB 32 was passed 10 years ago – will be vigilant and vigorous in making sure California’s climate change goals are met, and are met as we all intended.”

For full text of the bills, visit: http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov

California’s Leadership on Climate Change
While California emits around 1 percent of the world’s greenhouse gases, the state is playing a leading role in broadening collaboration among subnational leaders.

These efforts include spearheading the Under2Coalition, a global climate pact among cities, states and countries to limit the increase in the world’s average temperature to below 2 degrees Celsius. A total of 135 jurisdictions representing 32 countries and six continents have now signed or endorsed the agreement. Together, they represent more than 783 million people and $21 trillion in GDP, equivalent to more than a quarter of the global economy. Signatories commit to either reducing greenhouse gas emissions 80 to 95 percent below 1990 levels by 2050 or achieving a per capita annual emission target of less than 2 metric tons by 2050.

In the past year, the Governor has traveled to the United Nations headquarters in New York, the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris, the Vatican in Italy and the Climate Summit of the Americas in Toronto, Canada to call on other leaders to join California in the fight against climate change.

Governor Brown also joined an unprecedented alliance of heads of state, city and state leaders – convened by the World Bank Group and International Monetary Fund – to urge countries and companies around the globe to put a price on carbon.

These efforts build on a number of other international climate change agreements with leaders from the Czech Republic, the Netherlands, Mexico, China, North America, Japan, Israel, Peru and Chile and Governor Brown’s efforts to convene hundreds of world-renowned researchers and scientists around a groundbreaking call to action – called the consensus statement – which translates key scientific climate findings from disparate fields into one unified document.

Last October, Governor Brown signed landmark legislation – SB 350 – to double the rate of energy efficiency savings in California buildings and generate half of the state’s electricity from renewable sources by 2030. Governor Brown also committed to reduce today’s petroleum use in cars and trucks by up to 50 percent within the next 15 years; make heating fuels cleaner; reduce the release of methane, black carbon and other potent pollutants across industries; and manage farm and rangelands, forests and wetlands so they can store carbon.

Additionally, the Governor issued an executive order last year to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in California 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030, a goal which is now codified by SB 32.

The impacts of climate change are already being felt in California and will disproportionately impact the state’s most vulnerable populations.

Sep 022016
 

GovernorBrown

Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. issued the following statement regarding the death of California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) electrician Jorge Lopez on September 1st 2016:

“Anne and I were saddened to learn of the death of Jorge Lopez, who worked each day to make our California roads safer. We extend our deepest sympathies to his family, friends and many colleagues who are mourning this tragedy.”

Jorge Lopez, 57, of Sylmar, died when he was struck by a big rig as he was standing outside his vehicle on State Route 14 in Acton. Two other Caltrans employees driving behind Lopez were uninjured in the accident.

Lopez is the 185th Caltrans employee to lose his life on the job. He is survived by his wife Leticia and three children.

In honor of Lopez, Capitol flags will be flown at half-staff.

Jul 052016
 

MayorGarcettiOnGunSafetyLegislation

“I applaud and thank President pro Tem Kevin de León, Speaker Anthony Rendon, and Governor Brown for bringing new rationality to state law on firearm safety. Reducing gun violence is one of our highest priorities, and Los Angeles has already taken real steps to lower the number of deadly weapons on the street — passing our own ban on large-capacity magazines, and requiring that handguns be locked up or disabled with a trigger lock when not in use. I urge Congress to follow the lead of L.A. and California, and listen to the millions of Americans who want guns kept away from criminals and others who pose a threat to our families and communities.”  Mayor Eric Garcetti

Jun 152016
 
Governor "Jerry" Brown

Governor “Jerry” Brown

Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. announced the following Governor’s Appointments:

Peter Cervinka, 44, of Sacramento, has been appointed chief deputy director at the California Department of Social Services, where he has served as program deputy director for benefits and services since 2009. Cervinka served in several positions at the California Health and Human Services Agency from 2007 to 2009, including assistant secretary in the Office of Program and Fiscal Affairs and assistant associate secretary in the Office of Legislation. He served in several positions at the California Department of Finance from 2002 to 2007 and from 1998 to 2000, including assistant program budget manager, principal program budget manager and finance budget analyst. Cervinka was a staff services manager at the State Water Resources Control Board from 2000 to 2002. He earned a Master of Science degree in agricultural and resource economics from the University of California, Davis. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $156,372. Cervinka is a Democrat.

Vivien Avella, 48, of Calabasas, has been reappointed to the California Board of Vocational Nursing and Psychiatric Technicians, where she has served since 2013. Avella was senior managing director at FTI Consulting from 2000 to 2003 and director at Ernst and Young LLP from 1997 to 2000. She earned a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Chicago, Booth School of Business. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Avella is registered without party preference.

Donna Norton, 58, of Dixon, has been reappointed to the California Board of Vocational Nursing and Psychiatric Technicians, where she has served since 2014. Norton has been a licensed vocational nurse for Kaiser Permanente since 1989. She was a licensed vocational nurse at the Fairfield Medical Group from 1985 to 1989 and a licensed vocational nurse and phlebotomist at Oneida Hospital from 1984 to 1985. Norton was a licensed vocational nurse at Straub Hospital from 1981 to 1985 and for the U.S. Army at Tripler Army Hospital from 1975 to 1981. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Norton is registered without party preference.

Marq Truscott, 54, of Sacramento, has been reappointed to the California Landscape Architects Technical Committee, where he has served since 2015. Truscott has served as a landscape architecture lecturer at the University of California, Davis since 1995. He was president at Quadriga Landscape Architecture and Planning Inc. from 1997 to 2015 and at Collaborations from 1991 to 1997. Truscott was an associate at the Austin Hansen Group from 1987 to 1991 and a landscape architectural designer at BSI Consulting from 1983 to 1987. He is chair-elect of the Urban Land Institute, Sacramento and a member of the Blue Line Arts Board of Directors, American Society of Landscape Architects’ Council of Fellows Executive Committee and Board of Trustees, Friends of Light Rail and Transit Board of Directors and the University of California, Davis Landscape Architecture Program Advisory Board. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Truscott is registered without party preference.

Robyn Fisher, 47, of Hayward, has been appointed to the California Reading and Literature Project Advisory Board. Fisher has been president and chief executive officer at R.T. Fisher Educational Enterprise Inc. since 1999. She was associate director of pre-college programs at San Jose State University from 1998 to 2001, where she was director of the San Jose California Student Opportunity and Access Program from 1996 to 2001. Fisher was a budget analyst in the San Jose City Manager’s Office from 1993 to 1996 and a legislative correspondent and community information coordinator in the San Jose Mayor’s Office from 1991 to 1993. She earned Doctor of Education and Master of Education degrees in educational leadership from Mills College and a Master of Public Administration degree from San Jose State University. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no compensation. Fisher is a Democrat.

David Dias, 55, of Pleasanton, has been reappointed to the California Contractors State License Board, where he has served since 2011. Dias has been a business representative at Sheet Metal Workers’ Local Union No. 104 since 2005. He was an apprentice instructor at Foothill College from 1998 to 2005 and a field supervisor at Therma Inc. from 1997 to 2005. Dias was a sheet metal worker foreman at RH Tinney from 1990 to 1997, where he was an apprentice from 1986 to 1990. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Dias is a Democrat.

Susan Granzella, 65, of Sacramento, has been reappointed to the California Contractors State License Board, where she has served since 2014. Granzella held several positions at Visa Inc. from 1996 to 2014, including senior director and vice president for technical publication and global development audit and compliance coordination. She is a member of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Sacramento Board of Directors. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Granzella is a Democrat.

Marlo Richardson, 37, of Playa del Rey, has been reappointed to the California Contractors State License Board, where she has served since 2015. Richardson has been a police lieutenant with the Los Angeles Police Department Airport Division since 1999. She is chair of public safety for the Second Supervisorial District in Los Angeles County and a member California Women Lead, International Association of Chiefs of Police and the California State Bar Ethics Committee. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Richardson is a Democrat.

Bill Nack, 68, of Menlo Park, has been reappointed to the 1a District Agricultural Association, Grand National Rodeo, Cow Palace Fair Board of Directors, where he has served since 2012. Nack was business manager for the San Mateo County Building and Construction Trades Council, AFL – CIO from 1999 to 2015. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no compensation. Nack is a Democrat.

Justin Lawson, 41, of Bakersfield, has been appointed to the 15th District Agricultural Association, Kern County Fair Board of Directors. Lawson has been superintendent of operations at the Macpherson Oil Company since 2009. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no compensation. Lawson is registered without party preference.

 

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Oct 092013
 
Governor and First Lady Honor 1st Lt. Jennifer M. Moreno

Governor and First Lady Honor 1st Lt. Jennifer M. Moreno / Anything L.A.

On behalf of all Californians, Governor Brown and First Lady Anne Gust Brown honor 1st Lt. Jennifer M. Moreno, who bravely gave her life in service to our state and nation. The Governor and First Lady extend their deepest condolences to her family and friends at this difficult time.

In memorial, Governor Brown ordered that flags be flown at half-staff over the State Capitol today. 1st Lt. Moreno’s family will receive a letter of condolence from the Governor.
1st Lt. Jennifer M. Moreno, 25, of San Diego, CA, died October 6, in Zhari District, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained when enemy forces attacked her unit with an improvised explosive device. She was assigned to the Madigan Army Medical Center, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, WA. 1st Lt. Moreno was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

Sep 162013
 
Governor Brown Expands Partnership With China To Combat Climate Change

Governor Brown Expands Partnership With China To Combat Climate Change. / Anything L.A.

Building on California’s growing relationship with China, Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. today joined China’s top climate official, National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) Vice Chairman Xie Zhenhua, to sign a first-of-its-kind agreement on climate change between the NDRC and a subnational entity. The NDRC oversees China’s efforts to address climate change and much of the government’s economic strategy.

“The fact that the National Development and Reform Commission of the People’s Republic of China is entering into an agreement with one of the fifty states reflects the important position of California not only in the economy, but in science, technology and climate change initiatives,” said Governor Brown before signing today’s agreement. “I see the partnership between China, between provinces in China, and the state of California as a catalyst and as a lever to change policies in the United States and ultimately change policies throughout the world.”

The MOU seeks to enhance cooperation through a range of activities, including:
• Mitigating carbon emissions;
• Strengthening performance standards to control greenhouse gasses;
• Designing and implementing carbon emissions trading systems;
• Sharing information on policies and programs to strengthen low carbon development;
• Exchanging personnel and jointly organizing workshops and training; and
• Researching clean and efficient energy technologies.

This agreement builds on more than a year and a half of significant diplomatic and business exchanges between California and China, including the Governor’s Trade and Investment Mission to China, the opening of the California-China Office of Trade and Investment in Shanghai and a meeting with China’s President Xi Jinping. Partnership on climate change was one of many subjects the Governor discussed with President Xi and a key component of the trade mission, which included a meeting with officials from the National Development and Reform Commission and remarks on climate change at Tsinghua University in Beijing. In June, California Air Resources Board Chair Mary Nichols also traveled to Shenzhen, site of China’s first carbon trading program, to pledge cooperation on emissions trading.
Photo captions can be found below:

1.) Governor Brown meets with NDRC officials.
2.) Governor Brown and Vice Chairman Xie Zhenhua (left) sign MOU.
For high resolution copies of these photos, please contact Danella Debel, Office of the Governor at Danella.Debel@gov.ca.gov.
Photo Credit: Brad Alexander, Governor’s Office of Emergency Services.
The agreement, signed today, is copied below:

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING TO ENHANCE COOPERATION ON LOW CARBON DEVELOPMENT BETWEEN THE NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND REFORM COMMISSION OF THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA AND THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This MOU to Enhance Cooperation on Low Carbon Development is entered into by the National Development and Reform Commission of the People’s Republic of China (NDRC) and the State of California of the United States of America (California) and hereafter jointly referred to as the “Parties,” in order to strengthen and coordinate efforts to combat global climate change, promote clean and efficient energy and support low carbon development, while protecting public health, the environment and natural resources.
Article 1 Areas of Cooperation
The Parties agree to cooperate in the following areas, on the basis of the principle of equality and mutual benefit:
• Activities to mitigate carbon emissions while enabling sustained economic growth;
• Activities to strengthen performance standards within various economic sectors to control carbon, methane and other high global warming potential gases while enabling economic growth;
• Activities to implement carbon emissions trading systems and other market-based instruments;
• Activities that strengthen support for low carbon and ETS pilot programs;
• Activities that reduce energy consumption among industrial, commercial, and residential buildings;
• Activities that increase the usage of electrified transportation;
• Activities that support new and expanded markets for clean and efficient energy technologies, including within energy-intensive industries and transportation;
• Activities that support joint-ventures, partner-agreements, and capital investments in the design, construction and operation of clean and efficient energy and infrastructure projects; and
• Other mutually agreed activities.

Article 2 Forms of Cooperation
Forms of cooperation may include the following and any other forms agreed to by both Parties:
• Sharing information and experiences regarding policies and programs to strengthen low carbon development across economic sectors;
• Sharing policy design of carbon emissions trading programs;
• Inviting the other Party to advise on program and policy design and rule-making processes that it developed;
• Exchanges and temporary assignments of personnel from one of the Parties to the other;
• Cooperative research on clean and efficient energy technologies, including developing shared research, development and deployment projects;
• Joint organization of symposia, seminars, workshops, exhibitions and training; and
• Any other mutually agreeable forms of cooperation that contribute to the purpose of this MOU.
Article 3 Implementation
The Parties shall, on a regular basis, inform and consult with one another on matters of common interest that represent opportunities for mutual benefit consistent with this MOU.
In order to explore specifically how to collaborate through the framework of the MOU, the Parties agree to form an MOU Implementation Taskforce, co-chaired by the Director General of the Department of Climate Change for the NDRC side and the Deputy Cabinet Secretary and Senior Advisor to the Governor for the California side. Additionally, NDRC will be represented by the Director General of the Department of Environmental Protection and Resource Conservation, Director General of the Department of International Cooperation, Director General of the Energy Research Institute and Director General of National Center for Climate Change Strategy and International Cooperation, and California will be represented on this taskforce by the Secretary of the California Environmental Protection Agency, Chairman of the California Air Resource Board, and Chair of the California Energy Commission.

The Taskforce will coordinate the implementation of this MOU, as appropriate, with other agreements between entities in California and the People’s Republic of China, and will meet in person once annually and by video or telephone conference as often as necessary.

Article 4 Duration, Termination, Modification This MOU will remain in effect for two years from the date of its signature by the parties and may be amended and/or extend its effective term as agreed by the Parties in writing.

Either Party may withdraw from this MOU after 45 days written notice to the other Party.

The present MOU is signed in San Francisco, California on September 13, 2013 in the Chinese and English languages, both texts being equally authentic.

National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) Vice Chairman Xie Zhenhua
FOR THE NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND REFORM COMMISSION OF THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA
California Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr.
FOR THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Apr 292013
 
Governor Brown Issues Proclamation Declaring Workers Memorial Day

Governor Brown Issues Proclamation Declaring Workers Memorial Day / Anything L.A.

PROCLAMATION

The workers who grow our food, catch our fish, transport our goods, maintain our roads and extract raw materials from the earth risk their lives every day. While we fittingly set aside a number of special days each year to honor those who have fallen while defending our country or protecting our communities, today is a day to remember those who have lost life or health as a result of their work in any occupation.

Worldwide, an estimated two million people die each year from work-related accidents and illnesses. In California, 360 workers lost their lives in 2011. Today, let us express our gratitude to the workers who have made the ultimate sacrifice, and rededicate ourselves to the cause of establishing and maintaining safeguards against workplace illness and injury.

NOW THEREFORE I, EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor of the State of California, do hereby proclaim April 28, 2013, as “Workers Memorial Day.”

IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Great Seal of the State of California to be affixed this 26th day of April 2013.
___________________________________
EDMUND G. BROWN JR.
Governor of California