Mar 302014
 

Getty Museum Heaven and Earth Byzantine IlluminationHeaven and Earth: Byzantine Illumination at the Cultural Crossroads
Date: Daily, March 25 – June 22, 2014,
Location: North Pavilion, Plaza Level, Getty Cent. The glittering courts of the Byzantine Empire (A.D. 330–1453) have long been admired for their rich tradition of manuscript illumination. The prominent use of gold, a striking sense of naturalism,
and a distinctive spiritual character were among the widely celebrated aspects of Byzantine art in the Middle Ages. These qualities inspired artists and patrons in other Christian locales, including western Europe, Armenia, and Ethiopia. Primarily drawn from the Getty Museum’s collection, this exhibition also features important loans in partnership with Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections, on view at the Getty Villa from April 9 through August 25, 2014.

Apr 032013
 

About the J. Paul Getty Trust

J. Paul Getty Trust

The Getty is based in Los Angeles / Anything L.A.

The J. Paul Getty Trust is a cultural and philanthropic institution dedicated to critical thinking in the presentation, conservation, and interpretation of the world’s artistic legacy. Through the collective and individual work of its constituent Programs—Getty Conservation Institute, Getty Foundation, J. Paul Getty Museum, and Getty Research Institute—it pursues its mission in Los Angeles and throughout the world, serving both the general interested public and a wide range of professional communities with the conviction that a greater and more profound sensitivity to and knowledge of the visual arts and their many histories are crucial to the promotion of a vital and civil society.

Locations
The Getty is based in Los Angeles, California, and welcomes nearly 1.8 million visitors each year to its two locations, the Getty Center in Los Angeles and the Getty Villa in Malibu.

The Getty Center, a dramatic hilltop campus designed by Richard Meier, opened in 1997 and celebrated its tenth anniversary in 2007.

The Getty Villa in Malibu, the original location of the J. Paul Getty Museum, reopened in early 2006 with a new mission as an educational center and museum dedicated to the arts and cultures of ancient Greece, Rome, and Etruria.

Both the Getty Center and the Getty Villa serve a varied audience through exhibitions, conservation, scholarship, research, and public programs.

History
J. Paul Getty viewed art as a civilizing influence in society and strongly believed in making art available to the public for its education and enjoyment. He opened the J. Paul Getty Museum to the public in 1954. This small museum, established in his ranch house in Malibu, housed collections of Greek and Roman antiquities, 18th-century French furniture, and European paintings. Fascinated with the ancient world of the Mediterranean, he later built a Roman-style villa, modeled after the Villa dei Papiri of the first century A.D.

When most of Mr. Getty’s personal estate passed to the Trust in 1982, the Trustees sought to make a greater contribution to the visual arts through an expanded museum as well as a range of new programs. The Getty Conservation Institute, the Getty Research Institute, and the Grant Program were founded in the 1980s. The Grant Program became the Getty Foundation in 2005.

The J. Paul Getty Trust continues Mr. Getty’s vision, supported by directions from his will, which calls for “the diffusion of artistic and general knowledge.”

Historical records of the J. Paul Getty Trust’s activities are held in the Institutional Archives at the Getty Research Institute.

Aug 172012
 

THE GETTY CELEBRATES THE MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY LEGACY OF FRANZ XAVER MESSERSCHMIDT’S DISTINCTIVE CHARACTER HEADS

Exhibition features contemporary artists including Tony Bevan, Tony Cragg, Ken Gonzales-Day, Bruce Nauman, Pierre Picot, Arnulf Rainer, and Cindy Sherman

Legacy of Messershmidt At Getty Museum

Messerschmidt and Modernity At the J. Paul Getty Museum, Getty Center July 24–October 14, 2012 LOS ANGELES

The intriguing series of heads that are collectively known as Character Heads, created by the German Baroque artist Franz Xaver Messerschmidt (1736–1783) during the last 13 years of his life, have become increasingly popular with the general public through a series of recent exhibitions and books devoted to these expressive works. Furthermore, the sculptures, depicting various states of emotion and expression, have also captured the imaginations of generations of artists—especially during the 20th and 21st centuries.

Messerschmidt and Modernity, on view at the J. Paul Getty Museum from July 24 through October 14, 2012, is the first exhibition to explore the contemporary legacy of these surprisingly modern-looking sculptures, which were carved in alabaster, or cast in a lead or tin alloy. Along with Messerschmidt’s works, the exhibition will feature a selection of modern and contemporary works of art that testify to the lasting impact of these astonishing heads. Eight Character Heads will be exhibited—among them the Getty’s own Vexed Man— along with a newly discovered reduced variation of a now-lost Character Head known as A Cheeky Nitpicky Mocker, which has never before been exhibited publically. Contemporary artists featured in the exhibition include Tony Bevan, Tony Cragg, Ken Gonzales-Day, Bruce Nauman, Pierre Picot, Arnulf Rainer, Cindy Sherman, and Emily Young.

“Messerschmidt’s Character Heads have appealed to audiences since they were first produced. They were especially popular in turn-of-the-century Vienna and subsequently inspired modern artists of the 20th century,” explains Antonia Boström, senior curator of sculpture and decorative arts at the J. Paul Getty Museum. “Now, this unparalleled series of sculptures is enjoying a renewed popularity—not only fascinating to museum audiences and scholars, but compelling for contemporary artists.” The exhibition demonstrates how Messerschmidt’s heads are linked to the 18th and 19th centuries’ fascination with expression and the “passions,” as well as with the pseudosciences of physiognomy and pathognomy. It also traces how this series has influenced the work of artists in fin-de-siècle Vienna and contemporary artists in Austria, Great Britain, and the United States.