Feb 012017
 

Celebrate Valentine’s Day With Metro

Metro is becoming a part of Los Angeles in more ways than one. Not only more Angelenos are using Metro to commute but we’re discovering the role Metro plays in supporting culture in L.A.

Last Sunday, Metro extended its support to Los Angeles museums and its visitors by offering discounted fares. Now, with Valentine’s Day just around the corner, Metro steps up its game.

On Sunday, February 12th – on the weekend preceding Valentine’s Day – Metro invites you to attend a free Valentine’s Day Art Tour on the Gold Line. The tour will begin at the Gold Line Arcadia Station at 2 p.m. and end at Azusa Downtown Station at 4:30 p.m.

The tour will include station art and even pop-up theatre featuring Shakespearian love stories. The performances will be staged by the Independent Shakespeare Co. 

On Valentine’s Day (Tuesday, February 14th) you are invited to…. dance the dance of love: tango! Take a spin in the Union Station’s Historic Ticketing Hall! Don’t know how to tango? No problem! You’ll have the opportunity to take a free tango lesson! There’ll be dancing and live music by the orchestra Tangótico! And when you’re ready to watch professionals dance the tango Carlos Barrionuevo and Mayte Valdes will show you how it’s really done! Doors open at 7:30 p.m. Dancing from 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

Another great news: FREE TAP cards will be available for attendees at the start of the tour. Parking is available at Arcadia Station.

Celebrating Valentine’s Day With Metro? Sounds like fun and on the budget to boot! Who knew that art, Shakespeare, tango and Valentine’s Day can come in one sentence with Metro? We didn’t, but hey, kudos to Metro! Valentine’s Day With Metro is a great way to entertain the community AND expand Metro’s fan base.

 

Comment?

Name
Email
Comment Title
Rating
Comment Content

 

 

Feb 192013
 

BLACK RABBIT, WHITE HOLE

March 2 – April 6, 2013
Opening Reception Saturday, March 2, 6-9 p.m.

NICHOLAS AGUAYO
GABRIELE BEVERIDGE (London)
JENNIFER BOYSEN
CLAUDE COLLINS-STRACENSKY
EDUARDO CONSUEGRA
JOHN DIVOLA
MICHAEL DOPP
KIM FISHER
EMILIE HALPERN
BARBARA KASTEN (Chicago)
ALICE KONITZ
CHRIS LIPOMI
CURTIS MANN
CAMERON MARTIN (New York)
IAN PEDIGO (New York)
ISAAC RESNIKOFF
MATT SAUNDERS (Berlin)
MELANIE SCHIFF
NILS SCHIRRMACHER
DANIEL R. SMALL
ALICE WALTON (London)

Curated by Amy Thoner

Samuel Freeman is pleased to announce Black Rabbit, White Hole, a group exhibition featuring 21 artists based in and outside of Los Angeles.  Spanning photographic, painting, sculptural, and mixed media works, the exhibition takes on—and reverses—the common literary tropes of the black hole and the white rabbit.

Much has been said about black holes.  As a conundrum of space-time and literary metaphor, it is well accepted that a black hole pulls light and matter into eternal oblivion.   Far more perplexing than the black hole’s endless void, however—and almost never referenced—the theoretical white hole is its perfect inverse, with matter and luminescence endlessly escaping, but no point of origin or entry for that light, whatsoever.  In a similar fashion, within the realm of magic, folklore and symbology, the rarely mentioned black rabbit gets overlooked in favor of its docile, omnipresent white counterpart, yet should be considered a more intriguing foil.  Fast, elusive, sometimes ominous, and easily camouflaged into darkness, the black rabbit is slippery.

Attempting to tonally capture this intuitive mid-moment between inversion of logic and poetic switch, the exhibition Black Rabbit, White Hole combines works that embrace, reverse or subvert metaphorical, logical, or material understandings of lightness, darkness, reflection and disappearance.  Equally represented is work that is bound to binaries, inverse relationships, or bipolarities.  The exhibition’s numerous photographic works probe zones of abstraction, medium-specific experimentation, conceptual or art-historical commentary, and photography’s relationship to sculpture and painting; John Divola’s Dark Star C and Barbara Kasten’s Studio Constructs preside as key touchstones for a younger generation’s rampant exploration of the photographic.   Mono- and bichromatic paintings invoke similar tensions between photomechanical reproduction and traditional painting, and sculptural works of uncanny geometries and humble materials show a nascent formalism with a marked tension between the crudely handmade/idiosyncratic and the highly polished or reductive.

Aug 092012
 

Browse New in Los Angeles Art

Video Showcase of Los Angeles Art

 

What’s new in Los Angeles art and where to find it?
There are several major art museums in Los Angeles, EVERY Angeleno should visit periodically. Some of the most interesting L.A. art museums are:

MOCA, the Museum of Contemporary Art
250 South Grand Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90012

LACMA, Los Angeles County Museum of Art
5905 Wilshire Boulevard  Los Angeles, CA 90036
(323) 857-6000

Getty’s Museum
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA 90049-1679
(310) 440-7300

Hammer Museum
10899 Wilshire Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90024
Phone: 310.443.7000

Each of them is noteworthy not only for its in-house collection but for periodically hosting visiting exhibitions. With that said, smaller L.A. art galleries are worthy of your attention as well.

It is at the smaller L.A. art galleries that the cutting edge new artists and new art are being introduced long before gaining recognition of the art establishment. Visiting these smaller art galleries is an exciting adventure: great for a weekend outing and – in some cases – certainly worthy of an investment in a new talented artist who may some day make you rich…..

Video Showcase of Los Angeles Art