Jan 242017
 
L.A. Women’s March Larger than in Washington D.C.

2017 Women’s March in Los Angeles

Many sources put the number of participants in Los Angeles Women’s March at 750,000. (The Women’s March in Washington D.C. is estimated at 400,000 – 500,000 participants.) It was one of the largest protests in L.A.’s history and yet, there were no unrests and no one was arrested. The march was well organized. Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti was one of the speakers. Los Angeles along with its leaders stepped up and delivered. Our message was clear: we will protect our values and our rights.

We didn’t stand alone, similar marches took place throughout the United States and the world. Celebrities joined Women’s Marches. The participation of celebrities from the entertainment industry gave more visibility to our common cause. Some of the celebrities that took part in January 21st 2017 protests in the United States are:

Jake and Maggie Gyllenhaal, Natalie Portman, Blake Lively, Alicia Keys, Vanessa Hudgens, Miley Cyrus, Ariana Grande, Mandy Moore, Jane Fonda, Chelsea Handler, Maria Bello, Charlize Theron, Chrissy Teigen, John Legend, Emma Watson, Drew Barrymore, Amy Schumer, Ashley Judd, Felicity Huffman, Idina Menzel, Zendaya, Gillian Anderson, Helen Mirren, America Ferrera, Katy Perry, Scarlett Johansson, Cher, Jessica Chastain, Katie Holmes, Rihanna, Jamie Lee Curtis, Whoopi Goldberg, Yoko Ono, Cynthia Nixon, Rosie Perez, Mindy Kaling, Bella Thorne, Uzo Aduba, Emily Ratajkowski, Elizabeth Gillies, Amber Tamblyn, Janet Mock, Lena Dunham, Melissa Harris-Perry, Diane Guerrero, David Beckman, Charlie Brotman, Suki Waterhouse, Sir Ian McKellan, Rita Ora and others.

In addition to the entertainment industry’s celebrities there were real-life legends standing up for what’s right. Some of them were: Angela Davis, Gloria Steinem and Michael Moore.

My favorite sign carried during Women’s Marches? Make America THINK, Again! As we’ve seen on January 21st 2017, America is thinking and most of the thinking people are in Los Angeles. 

Anything L.A. Magazine’s Editor, E. Elrich

 

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Jul 192016
 
Amy Schumer: Non-Consensual Sex

Amy Schumer

In a recent Marie Claire interview the popular comedienne shared that her first sexual experience wasn’t consensual. Many media outlets and bloggers ran with the story, referring to Amy’s experience as “rape”.

Is every instance of non-consensual sex, rape? Who has the authority to slap a label on another person’s experience?

As a public figure, Amy gives interviews. It is up to her what aspects of her personal life she chooses to share with media and the public at large and how. She spoke of non- consensual sex, not of rape.

Anything L.A. Magazine likes Amy Schumer, the artist. We see her as talented, funny, pretty and entertaining.

Amy Schumer became a household name as a hard-hitting, over-sharing stand-up comedienne appearing on Comedy Central and Last Comic Standing. Since then she’s proven her talent most notably on “Inside Amy Schumer” and “Trainwreck”. She is an accomplished writer, actress, and producer. Right now Amy is getting ready for a 50+ city world tour. Her memoir will make its debut next month. The woman isn’t wasting time!

Long story short, there are many reasons to like her. We are among Amy’s fans. There is nothing wrong with that. Re-interpreting another person’s experience by either a media outlet or a fan is. Using other person’s bad experience to explore the topic – or our own opinion on the subject – may not be a great idea, either.

Amy Schumer is an adult, independent and intelligent woman. To her it was “non-consensual sex”. If every instance of non-consensual sex is rape to you, you are entitled to your opinion. With that said, I don’t believe that anyone but Amy Schumer herself has the right to define her own experiences. She described it as unfortunate, unpleasant and stressful. She didn’t cry rape. She didn’t have the perpetrator prosecuted. She doesn’t identify herself as a rape victim or a rape survivor. Why would anyone want to bully her into victimhood?

Not every instance of non-consensual sex is rape. Not every person subjected to non-consensual sex is – or identifies herself as – a rape victim. Defining someone as a rape victim – without the person’s consent, yet another violation of personhood – is disempowering and perpetuates the effects of an already bad experience.

The fact that Amy Schumer is a public figure shouldn’t deprive her of the right to live and interpret her life on her own terms. I don’t know who her first sex partner was and I certainly don’t think of him well. But it’s obvious to me which one of the participants of the questionable sex act overcame its distaste with her dignity intact. I for one wouldn’t try to reframe Amy’s unfortunate sexual encounter as anything that would take away from her pride or power.

Anything L.A. Magazine’s Entertainment Editor / I. Sturm

 

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