Aug 162012
 

LACMA and The Academy Present First Stanley Kubrick Retrospective in the United States

Stanley Kubrick Retrospectve

(Left) A Clockwork Orange, (A Clockwork Orange, GB/United States 1970-71). Alex DeLarge (Malcolm McDowell) in the Korova milk bar. © Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.
(Center) During the filming of Spartacus (United States 1959–60) in Spain.
© Universal Studios Inc.
(Right) The Shining (Shining, GB/USA 1980). The daughters of former caretaker Grady (Lisa and Louise Burns). © Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (The Academy) are pleased to co-present the first U.S. retrospective of filmmaker Stanley Kubrick, developed in collaboration with the Kubrick Estate and the Deutsches Filmmuseum, Frankfurt. The exhibition provides access to the director’s extraordinary vision and working methods while illuminating the network of influences and conditions that came together to make his films universally regarded as modern masterpieces. The Los Angeles presentation is made possible by a generous gift from Steve Tisch.

“By featuring this legendary filmmaker and his oeuvre in his first retrospective within the context of an art museum, Stanley Kubrick will reevaluate how we define the artist in the twenty-first century, and simultaneously expand upon LACMA’s commitment to exploring the intersection of art and film,” said Michael Govan, CEO and Wallis Annenberg Director of LACMA. “We are also pleased to honor Kubrick’s impact on film and art history at our 2012 Art + Film Gala, along with artist Ed Ruscha, on October 27.”

“Stanley Kubrick represents the perfect opportunity to collaborate with LACMA on the presentation of film in a museum setting,” said Dawn Hudson, Academy CEO. “It is a taste of things to come when we open the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in the historic Wilshire May Company building on the LACMA campus.”

LACMA trustee Steve Tisch said, “I am glad to support this important retrospective of one of the greatest filmmakers of all time. This is one more example of LACMA’s commitment to film as an art form, along with past exhibitions like Tim Burton and Dalí: Painting & Film and recent acquisitions like Christian Marclay’s The Clock.”

Kubrick’s acclaimed repertoire of films, including Paths of Glory, Lolita, Dr. Strangelove, 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange, The Shining, Full Metal Jacket, and Eyes Wide Shut, among others, highlights not only his signature directorial tenacity but also major technological innovations of the time, such as filming by candlelight in Barry Lyndon and utilizing the front projection effect in 2001. The exhibition also includes an alternate beginning to this seminal science fiction film.

Kubrick’s films will be represented through a thoughtful selection of archival material, annotated scripts, photography, costumes, cameras and equipment, set models, original promotional materials, and props. The interdisciplinary exhibition draws attention to Kubrick’s fixation with historical research and his visionary adaptations of influences from the fine arts, design, and architecture, and enables visitors to experience the cinematic journey of one of the great artists of the twentieth century. The exhibition also includes sections dedicated to projects that were never completed, as well as to the special effects (visual and auditory) developed by Kubrick and his team.

Terry Semel, co-chair of LACMA’s board of trustees, said “I had the great privilege of working with Stanley on many of his films, including Barry Lyndon, The Shining, Full Metal Jacket, and Eyes Wide Shut. I am thrilled to see his work honored in a museum setting.”

Hawk Koch, Academy president, said “This is a major step in the Academy’s plan to create a premier movie museum in Los Angeles. We are pleased to co-present this retrospective with LACMA which will provide visitors the opportunity to experience Kubrick’s iconic work as well as his influence on our culture.”

The exhibition will be accompanied by a film retrospective at LACMA’s Bing Theater beginning in November, as well as public programs and conversations with Kubrick’s collaborators and people he influenced, and additional exhibition-related film series planned for spring 2013.

As part of this partnership, and to kick off the film retrospective, on Wednesday, November 7, the Academy will present “An Academy Salute to Stanley Kubrick.” The evening will feature film clips and a conversation hosted by actor Malcolm McDowell. Special guests will include Kubrick’s colleagues and collaborators. The event will also launch the Academy’s Kubrick exhibition, which will be open to the public through February 2013. Featuring items from the Academy’s permanent collection, the exhibition will illuminate the work of Kubrick’s collaborators, as well as the many artists who influenced Kubrick’s work. The salute and exhibition will take place at the Academy’s Samuel Golden Theater and Grand Lobby in Beverly Hills, respectively.

Stanley Kubrick originated at Deutches Filmmuseum, Frankfurt, and has since traveled to Berlin, Melbourne, Ghent, Zurich, Rome, Paris, and Amsterdam. The exhibition presentation at LACMA will be dramatically different from the international venues, with exhibition design by film production designer Patti Podesta.

Credit This exhibition was organized by the Deutsches Filmmuseum, Frankfurt am Main, Christiane Kubrick, and The Stanley Kubrick Archive at University of the Arts London, with the support of Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc., Sony-Columbia Pictures Industries Inc., Metro Goldwyn Mayer Studios Inc., Universal Studios Inc., and SK Film Archives LLC.

In Los Angeles, Stanley Kubrick is co-presented by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and was generously supported by Steve Tisch. Additional funding was provided by Warner Bros. Entertainment, Violet Spitzer-Lucas and the Spitzer Family Foundation.

Stanley Kubrick Biography Stanley Kubrick was born in 1928 in New York City. In 1945, at the age of 16, Kubrick had his first photograph published in Look magazine. As a staff photographer at Look from 1946 to 1951, Kubrick took on a range of assignments, photographing both celebrity subjects and urban documentaries. He made his first film short, Day of the Fight, in 1951; after directing two more shorts, Kubrick directed and produced his first feature-length film, Fear and Desire, in 1953. Since then, Kubrick followed with such films as Paths of Glory, Spartacus, Lolita, Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange, Barry Lyndon, The Shining, Full Metal Jacket, and Eyes Wide Shut. A pioneer in special effects and technological advances, Kubrick’s films often included the use of new photographic lenses, long tracking sequences, and orchestral music. With thirteen Academy Award nominations, Kubrick won the Oscar for Best Effects for 2001: A Space Odyssey in 1969. Kubrick died in Harpenden, England, on March 7, 1999, at the age of 70.

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